Consecrated…

D.L. Moody was terribly uneducated and somewhat illiterate. But in 1872, Moody attended a meeting in a hay barn in Dublin, Ireland. In the meeting, Pastor Henry Varley made a quietly profound statement, "The world has yet to see what God can do with and for and through and in a man, who is fully and wholly consecrated to him."
by Ray Jones on April 07, 2019

Consecrated…

D.L. Moody was terribly uneducated and somewhat illiterate. But in 1872, Moody attended a meeting in a hay barn in Dublin, Ireland. In the meeting, Pastor Henry Varley made a quietly profound statement, "The world has yet to see what God can do with and for and through and in a man, who is fully and wholly consecrated to him."

The next Sunday, sitting high up in Spurgeon's Tabernacle, Moody, as he listened to the preaching of Spurgeon, heard those words of Varley over and over again in his mind. He said to himself, "The world has yet to see! 'With and for and through and in a man'! Varley meant any man! Varley didn't say he had to be educated, or brilliant, or anything else—just a man! Well, by the Holy Spirit in me, I'll be one of those men."

In his joy, Moody began to weep. Sympathetic Christians seeing it, went to talk with him thinking that he was under great conviction, instead they learned that his tears were not a case of sin or repentance, but great joy, the joy of dedication to a high purpose.

It is still true. The world has yet to see what God can do with a man who is wholly consecrated to his will. It saw it once in the divine man, Christ Jesus—But among those who have demonstrated what it looks like for a person to be consecrated to the will of God, with the limitations of human nature, D.L. Moody stands high on the list.

The Bible speaks of the power that comes with a consecrated life in 2 Chronicles 16:9, “For the eyes of the Lord run to and fro throughout the whole earth, to give strong support to those whose heart is blameless toward him.” You and I can be those people, but notice it requires a heart that is fully yielded to the purpose of God. It has been said that, the mark of a saint is not perfection, but consecration. A saint is not a person without faults, but one who has given themselves without reserve to God.

As we continue our Freedom Campaign as a Church, let me call you to personal consecration and self-surrender. It is here that you find power, joy and fellowship with Christ in an unusual way. And it is only here that you discover the fullness of your relationship with your creator. But you can’t get there until you surrender to Him. A pastor once said, "Do you know that G. Campbell Morgan came to our country and preached one sermon that destroyed forty years of my sermons? For forty years I have been preaching on the duty of sacrifice—denying things to ourselves, giving up this and that. We practiced it in our family. We would give up one thing one week and try to use the money in some way that God might bless. Another week we would give up something else, and so on. Campbell Morgan said that what we needed to give up was not things but self; and that was the only thing we had not given up in our home. We had given up everything under the sun, but self." That is consecration! Why is that important? Because when we give up self, then all things are God’s and available for His use.  

Let me give you a great prayer offered by Charles Spurgeon. On January 6, 1850, Spurgeon was saved. And on February 1, he wrote out his prayer of personal consecration: “O’ great and unsearchable God, who knows my heart, and tries all my ways; with a humble dependence upon the support of your Holy Spirit, I yield up myself to You; as Your own reasonable sacrifice, I return to You Your own. I would be forever, unreservedly, perpetually Yours; while I am on earth, I will serve You; and may I enjoy You and praise You forever! Amen.” That’s a good prayer for each of us. And remember, God is always trying to take us someplace new. I love being your Pastor!

For God’s Glory Alone,

Bro. Ray 

 

 

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